Journal of Medicine and Health Research
 

Journal of Medicine and Health Research, ISSN No. : 2456-9178, Vol.: 2, Issue.: 3

Original Research Article

END TIDAL CO2 LEVELS, ADJUSTMENT AND PERFORMANCE IN HIGH-ALTITUDE MOUNTAIN CLIMBING

 

SEOANE LEANDRO1*, RODRIGUEZ MARCELO1 AND  POSADAS MARTINEZ MARIA LOURDES2

1Hospital Universitario Austral, Av Perón 1500, Derqui, ZC1629, Argentina.

2Hospital Italiano de Buenos Aires, Juan Domingo Perón 4190, ZC 1181, Argentina.

Abstracts

During the increase of the physical activity the CO2 pressure increases from mild to moderate effort at the end tidal CO2 (PET CO2).

Objetive: Our target was to determine the PETCO2 values at rest and after the 6-minute walk test at different heights, as an indicator of severity or mountain climbers’ maladaptation to altitudes.

Design: This is a retrospective observational study. 

Methods: The variables of exposition were the measurement of the HR, RF, CO2 and SO2 at rest and in the 6-minute walk test, in three campgrounds.

Results: 8 volunteers were included to reach Cerro Plata peak in Argentina (6000 meters). The delta HR index increased to 9 (IC 8-11, p 0.001) beats per minutes as they climbed up. However, when they were compared by groups, the ones who reached the peak had 5 (IC 3-7, p 0.001) beats per minute less than to those who did not make it to the top. The SO2 delta globally increased a 3% in each campground (IC 2-5, p 0.001), still the group which reached the top showed a delta variation of -2% (IC -6 a 1, p 0.21). The delta PETCO2 globally increased a 0.72 in each campground (IC 0.05-1.38, p 0.03), though the group which reached the top showed a delta variation of -3% (IC -4 a -1, p 0.001).

Conclusions: A high delta HR would result in the only parameter of bad prognosis in higher campgrounds. Both parameters (SaO2 - PETCO2) showed a lower delta in the 6-minute walk test for those who reached the top.

Keywords :

Acute mountain sickness; psychological adaptation; lactic acid; end tidal CO2.